Wednesday, February 2, 2011

MBA student puts business ethics to the test

Business ethics are a key value students learn in Post's MBA program
Post University's final course to earn an MBA is the successful completion of our Capstone Project, in which our students are required to develop a business plan, proposal, or project.

Students must bring to bear all of their learnings and knowledge from their Post MBA courses to demonstrate their competence in their chosen concentration. They also must be active contributors to the course's online discussion forum.

One of our Capstone students, Heather Rougeot, is a Business Analyst in Purchasing at St. Vincent’s Medical Center in Bridgeport, Conn. Recently on our discussion forum, we posed the question, “What values have you learned in the MBA Program?”

Her response struck me. I asked her if I could share it on our blog, and she kindly obliged. Here's Heather's response, edited only for typos for clarity. In my opinion, this is why we do what we do!

Thank you for your contribution, Heather!



I have to share a short story.

At work, a small group of us are creating a work flow for Purchasing's. We are developing receipt and pricing variance work flows to better identify best practices. In confidential standings, one person asserted if the price is lower than our contract price we should change the price to meet the lower price. The other person said yes, then quickly said no. Person number two basically stated that if a vendor cheated us out of money we would take our business elsewhere and secondly, eventually we will owe that money back to the vendor. This person also made the wisest statement of all. He said, "I want to instill and conduct my business using good ethical practices."

I smiled and realized this is a person I can honestly say I am proud to work for and be a part of his team (and to be mentored by).

The MBA program has taught me a lot about using good ethical practices, avoiding plagiarism, avoiding various legalities that can easily entice honest people into crooked people (i.e. kickbacks, etc.).

I could have been tricked by a salesman into believing "a split of paybacks is fine because everyone does it!" But throughout my programs, we are constantly reminded about academic honesty, ethics, and social and corporate responsibility.

Thank you,
Heather Rougeot